Plenary speakers

Ian Graham

Dublin, Ireland

Tuesday 28 May PREVENTING CVD RISK: WHERE DO WE STAND?

Estimating risk: What's new?

Helen Hobbs

Dallas, USA

Monday 27 May METABOLIC DYSFUNCTION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

Lipids, Lipases and Fatty Liver Disease

Helen Hobbs is Professor of Internal Medicine and Molecular Genetics at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She holds the Dallas Heart Ball Chair in Cardiology Research, the Philip O’Bryan Montgomery Jr., M.D., Distinguished Chair in Developmental Biology, and the Eugene McDermott Distinguished Chair for the Study of Human Growth and Development. Professor Hobbs obtained her undergraduate degree from Stanford University prior to attending Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. After completing an internship in internal medicine at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, she moved to Dallas, Texas where she finished her clinical training and served as chief resident in internal medicine at Parkland Memorial Hospital. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Drs. Michael Brown and Joseph Goldstein before joining the faculty of UT Southwestern in 1987. She is Director of the McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development, which serves as the Center for Human Genetics at UT Southwestern.  She is also Director of the Dallas Heart Study, a longitudinal, multiethnic, population-based study of Dallas County. Her work focuses on defining the genetic determinants of plasma lipid levels and cardiovascular risk. Most recently, she has identified genetic variants that confer susceptibility to fatty liver disease. Her professional affiliations include the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Disease Council of the American Heart Association, the Association of American Physicians, the American Society of Human Genetics and the American Society of Clinical Investigation. She has received numerous awards, most recently the Passano Award (with Jonathan Cohen) in 2016, and the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences and Pearl Meister Greengard Prize, Rockefeller University, both in 2015.

Thomas Lüscher

Zurich, Switzerland

Tuesday 28 May PREVENTING CVD RISK: WHERE DO WE STAND?

Estimating risk: What's new?

Laszlo Nagy

Debrecen, Hungary

Wednesday 29 May LOOKING TO THE FUTURE - NOVEL TREATMENT STRATEGIES

System-level analyses of inflammatory and repair macrophages reveal an integrated circuitry of lipid and epigenomic changes

László Nagy is Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Debrecen (since 2006), Head of the Center for Clinical Genomics and Personalized Medicine Hungary (since 2000) and Director of Genomic Control of Metabolism Program and Professor of the Diabetes & Obesity, Research Center Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at Lake Nona (since 2013). After completing his medical degree and PhD at the University Medical School, Debrecen, Hungary he undertook postdoctoral research at the University of Texas Medical School, Houston, USA (1992 – 1995). Subsequent appointments included International Research Scholar of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (2001-2011), a Wellcome Trust International Senior Research Fellow (2005-2010), and a Fulbright Scholar Visiting Scientist, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies (2010-2011). His affiliations include the Endocrine Society (USA), American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, American Association of Immunologists, and the American Physiological Society. He is a founding member of the Hungarian Society for Bioinformatics.  Professor Nagy is the recipient of numerous awards, most recently the ESCI Award for Excellence in Biomedical Investigation (2008), Academia Europaea (2012), Scientist of the Year 2012 (City of Debrecen, Dehir), and the Béla Tankó prize (2014).

 

Matthias Nahrendorf

Boston, USA

Wednesday 29 May LOOKING TO THE FUTURE - NOVEL TREATMENT STRATEGIES

The immune system: The next game-changer?

Matthias Nahrendorf is Professor of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Director of the Mouse Imaging Program at the Center for Systems Biology, Simches Research Center Boston, USA. His current research interests focus on 1) imaging of molecular processes during the healing phase after myocardial infarction; 2) imaging of heart transplant rejection; and 3) imaging of inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. Imaging targets are enzymes, innate immune cells and molecular players with a central role in cardiovascular disease. His research uses the entire spectrum of imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear and optical imaging techniques, with multimodal and hybrid approaches used to fuse molecular data with anatomical information. These technologies are part of a biologically driven research programme that aims at systematic understanding of inflammation and repair at a basic level, as well as maintaining a rigorous translational perspective.

Luke A. O’Neill

Dublin, Ireland

Monday 27 May METABOLIC DYSFUNCTION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

Macrophage immunometabolism: opportunities for phenotypical modulation?

Luke O’Neill is Professor, Inflammation Research in the School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. His research aims to provide a molecular understanding of innate immunity and inflammation, specifically the receptors involved in innate immunity, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nod-like receptors (NLRs, including Nlrp3), and signals activated. The role played by this system in inflammatory diseases is also under investigation. Ultimately, insights from this research may help in the design of novel treatments and diagnostics that could be applied to a range of diseases including atherosclerosis, sepsis, arthritis and cancer.

Chris Packard

Glasgow, UK

Tuesday 28 May PREVENTING CVD RISK: WHERE DO WE STAND?

Biomarkers predicting CVD

Kausik Ray

London, UK

Tuesday 28 May PREVENTING CVD RISK: WHERE DO WE STAND?

Estimating risk: What's new?

Marc Sabatine

Boston, USA

Wednesday 29 May LOOKING TO THE FUTURE - NOVEL TREATMENT STRATEGIES

New lipid drugs: Is LDL done, ready for new targets?

Lale Tokgözoglu

Ankara, Turkey

Tuesday 28 May PREVENTING CVD RISK: WHERE DO WE STAND?

Estimating risk: What's new?